If We Were Having Coffee: First Day of School Edition

admin-ajax.phpIf we were having coffee . . .

I’d tell you that the first day of classes at our university is actually tomorrow, but I’m pretty sure there won’t be time to chat with you tomorrow. So I’m happy to have this time with you now.

I’d also warn you that I have a lot to say about my teaching schedule and how things work at our university, since I’ve never really told you much about it before.

If we were having coffee . . .

I’d tell you that my schedule of courses went through quite a shift on Friday.  I have to scramble a bit, but overall I’m pleased with the new schedule. It’s much more interesting (and challenging) than the one I had before Friday, even though I’ve spent part of the weekend prepping for the first meeting of a class I haven’t taught before.

If we were having coffee . . .

I’m actually happy about going back to classes, when it was only a couple weeks ago when I wasn’t so sure about whether I’d have enough energy, and ideas, and motivation, and patience. I am so grateful that things came together for me in time.

If we were having coffee . . .

I’d respond to your question about what I am teaching this year. I’d tell you that my 13 credit hours of classes are spread out over three days–Monday, Wednesday, and Thursday, and I’m teaching my first night class. I’d tell you that 13 hours works out to six classes, which will probably surprise you. Several of the courses at our university are two credit hours each, and many of them actually run for two semesters. Only two of my classes are the same, so I’ll be prepping for five different classes each week. Luckily, there is some crossover in terms of activities that I can use with the students.

If we were having coffee . . .

I’d tell you that I teach for two departments–the English Language Center (ELC) and the Department of Applied English (DAE). What’s the difference, you ask? Well, DAE is the department for students who are majoring in English. All other students in the university, regardless of major, still have to take some required English courses. And that’s where the ELC comes in. They provide basic EFL (English as a Foreign Language) courses for non-English majors. The writing classes are two hours each–so that makes 6 hours.

If we were having coffee . . .

I’d tell you that I teach three classes for the DAE, all writing courses. One of them is first year writing for the freshmen, and the other two are second year writing for sophomores.  In the ELC, I teach two classes of seniors, but one of those classes is a specialized one that I developed (and have adjusted over the last couple of years) for students in the Architecture Department. Architecture is one of the few departments that has students for five years (instead of four), and they’re usually so busy that they aren’t too interested in English class. So let’s just say that they can be a challenge; but so far, I have been up for it.  [These English classes for seniors (or other 4th year students) are 2 hours each–for 4 hours.]

If we were having coffee . . .

I’d tell you that my last three hours are my first evening class, which is an advanced English course (for non-English majors) who want more than just the basic requirement. It is a three-credit course called Oral Reports, and I am frantically putting things together for tomorrow night. (Of course, it’s on the first day.) But the good news is that I’ve been working on some ideas, and I’m feeling fairly confident about it. I will be able to access the past year’s syllabus in the morning, and then I can finalize things. [Luckily, I did get a copy of the TOC (Table of Contents) and the first chapter of the book.]

If we were having coffee . . .

I’d ask if you have any other questions about what I’m teaching, just ask me. I’d be happy to share.

If we were having coffee . . .

I’d tell you that it’s 246 days til 60!