To or Not To Tuesday: Week 10

jjj-2016It’s Tuesday, and for me, that means it’s time for another To or Not To Tuesday, in which I pose a question about something I may or may not do, and then spend a paragraph or five talking through the decision that becomes obvious by the end of the post. The irony, of course, is that there is really no decision to be made, once everything is out on the WordPress table.

Well, this is week ten, and aside from a few awesome people who have made comments about what they may or may not do, and one reblog (thanks, Linda), my idea about posing To Do or Not To Do questions didn’t seem to catch fire. Which leads to this week’s question:

So for Week 10, the To or Not to Tuesday question is To Continue or Not Continue the To or Not to Tuesday.

I don’t think very many paragraphs are needed for this one. I had fun. I explored some ideas that I might otherwise just have mulled about without actually processing them. But with my theme for the new year: “make peace with your broken pieces” and my word for the year: direction, I think I can move through the process of finding my inner wisdom with much better filters, and that I don’t really need this weekly post anymore. Besides, I never had a banner for it. (Hey maybe! To or Not To Make a . . . . oh never mind!)  😉

Thanks to everyone who visited those posts. I appreciated your input on my mythical dilemmas. And I guess we’ll see what crazy things I come up with in 2016.

This post is for day 5 of JusJoJan.

A Focus for the New Year: #oneword2016

scarebothwaysIn the past I’ve used seasonal keywords, and they’ve worked rather well for me. But I didn’t keep up with it for more than a year’s worth of seasons. So when I first saw this idea of a single word for the whole year, I wasn’t sure that I could think of one word to encompass a whole year. After all, my choice of seasonal keywords seemed difficult enough.

But as 2015 came to a close and people were posting their #oneword 2016s, I realized that it was a good year for me to try it, too. At first, I was tempted to use the word no,” as I’ve seen a few others have done. As I’ve mentioned before, I tend to get really caught up in saying yes to anything that catches my interest, which is often more about someone else’s goal than my own. Another word I thought about was moratorium,” a word I acted on as a new year’s “non” resolution for 2013 in an attempt to keep myself from taking on too many new things.

But I realized that both of those words are driven largely by symptoms (doing too much, often without much discernment) and that they ignore the root cause — no yardstick to really measure the value of possibilities on my long-term goals.

I’ve accomplished quite a bit, but not by design. I jump into all kinds of opportunities as they’re presented, and I make the best of them, even if they sometimes have higher costs than I had anticipated. I don’t have many regrets, but life isn’t endless, and if I’m going to accomplish what I really want to do, I need to figure out what I really want to do.

I feel like the Scarecrow in the Wizard of Oz when it comes to knowing which way to go with the time I have left. While wandering and going with the flow and being spontaneous has served me well in many regards, it is, as time to find a star to hitch my wagon to. So my word for 2016 is:

DIRECTION

It doesn’t need to necessarily be about my direction for the rest of my life, though that would be a huge bonus, but for now, I’ll settle for having something concrete to strive for this year. Rather than just being busy and accomplishing things while I do, I want to have a destination, a measure of how I will determine whether or not I’ve met my goal.

I will start by using January to explore possibilities. By the 31st, I hope to have an idea or two about which direction I will take. I will also be finishing up a couple of projects that have completion dates in January, so that I will free up time and focus so that I am ready to head in the right direction and use that as a guide for the way I spend my time and energy in the coming year. Who knows what I’ll find along the yellow brick road.

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This post is part of JusJoJan, Day 4.

Weekend Coffee Share: Welcome 2016

weekendcoffeeshareIt’s Sunday, time to gather with family and friends and catch up on the week’s happenings. Check it out at Diane’s page.

If we were having coffee,

I’d tell you that I only have four more days left in Iowa before heading back to Michigan to start up the new semester.  It’s been wonderful to be here with David and his sister, even if one of her dogs can’t decide whether to play with me or bark at me.

If we were having coffee,

I’d tell you that I’ve made good use of my time here. The revisions of my co-authored paper are moving into the final phase, and the editing job I’m doing for an accreditation site visit are moving along.

If we were having coffee,

I’d tell you that I’m finalizing my plans for my two sections of Introduction to Criminal Justice and a hybrid section of Introduction to Sociology. This hybrid course features five in-person sessions at the beginning of the semester and another five (including the final exam) at the end. All the stuff in the middle is done online. I’m enjoying the chance to create something that will get students excited about sociology while having the freedom to try new things.

If we were having coffee,

I’d tell you that in addition to the work I need to do for my own projects, I’ve been helping Dave with the sorting of papers and belongings, arranging for furniture pick up, and making the place a little more cozy, so his sister can really call it her own, now that Mom has been gone nearly two years. If Cathy’s tests at the end of January go well and the cancer doesn’t require any major surgery or treatment, Dave will be back in Michigan in February. Fingers crossed for all of us.

If we were having coffee,

I’d tell you that I finally got my sewing machine figured out and I have machine quilted nearly half of my practice quilt. I’ll be able to start the actual quilting on Jack’s quilt very soon — maybe even tomorrow!

I’d also tell you that My Weekend Coffee Share is going to double as a JusJoJan post. Head over and check it out.  🙂

jjj-2016

The Pause That Refreshes: SoCS

It’s time for Stream of Consciousness Saturday, which means I’m also going to get a post in for Just Jot it January. What I like most about this happy coincidence is that I like getting a two for one in a post, AND SoCS posts usually end up being something I never would have written otherwise. So it’s a great surprise. If you’ve never tried it before, you should check it out. It can be really fun! So here is today’s prompt from Linda.

Your Friday prompt for Stream of Consciousness Saturday is: “pause/paws.”  Use one, use both, use ’em any way you’d like. Have fun!

When I saw this prompt, I couldn’t help think of the Coca-Cola commercial with the slogan “The Pause That Refreshes.” (OK, so I date myself.)

Refreshing or not, it’s time for a pause. Following the holidays, and all those reindeer paws and Santa Claus and shopping and festivities, a break is what most of us need. There is something to be said for that week between the holidays when people comment about not knowing what day it is because schedules as we typically know them during the rest of the year simply don’t exist. Many of us can just move through those days and catch our breath. The pause might actually be refreshing if it weren’t for all the hoopla leading up to the holidays, along with the reality of heading back to reality as soon as we recover from our New Year’s revelry (if we partake in such revelry and IF we’ve recovered by the time said reality sets in).

Still, the pause is something we look forward to, often hoping in vain that we will be more organized, less stressed, and full of contentment and good tidings. For many, the pause itself is an illusion, as we trade the crazy schedules and expectations of the holidays for the crazy schedules and expectations of the day-to-day routines we manage through the rest of the year.

One of the great things about Taiwan is that I was able to step out of the holiday tradition as I experienced it all my life. I experienced a different kind of pause because of the cultural differences. Although Christmas will be a holiday of sorts in 2016 in Taiwan, it wasn’t during the six years I was there. I have actually taught classes on Christmas Day, and Christmas Eve, and the days leading up to New Year’s (although that day was a holiday for different reasons). It isn’t until exams are finished and graded, and final grades submitted, that the holiday pause happened.

year-of-the-goat-cartoon_23-2147503522

The semesters in Taiwan are 18 weeks long, and while classes start a week or two later than they do here in the States, they don’t finish until the first or second week of January. Sometimes exams can sneak into the third week. THEN we have our semester break, with a three to four week break before the second semester starts following Chinese New Year. 2015 issued in the Year of the Goat.

In some ways, the preparations for festivities surrounding Chinese New Year are the same as the Christmas season for those who celebrate it. People plan their meals, clean their houses, pick up gifts. But in other ways, there are major differences. Where you celebrate each day of the Chinese New Year is proscribed, depending on how close you follow the ancient traditions. And while many people look forward to Chinese New Year’s Eve dinners based on the male’s family, and the reunion luncheons and dinners the following day based on the female’s family, it’s the same level of stress and activity that we experience on this side of the world.

I was fortunate to be invited to various Chinese New Year’s celebrations of various kinds, and I found that the sense of pause and catching one’s breath wasn’t really there. On the other hand, for someone like me, who only accepts a few invitations and picks up gifts for the hosts of the events I attend, the season is one where I can at least catch up on projects I’m behind on, even if it’s not a true pause. But occasionally, I was able to steal away hours and sometimes a few days to truly pause and recharge my batteries. It was during those semester breaks in Taiwan where most of my quilting time happened. I later learned to sneak it in other places, but CNY worked for me. I suspect though that it was largely due to the fact that it wasn’t MY holiday.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERABeing in Taiwan resulted in a huge shift in the way I approach Christmas. During my six years there, I sent greetings to family and friends, but aside from grandchildren, I didn’t do gifts. I invited students over to the house for a meal. I let them put up the tree, and we exchanged small gifts and ornaments, and they asked questions about the way Christmas was celebrated in America. But aside from that, it was business as usual, and we worked these gatherings around classes.

My first Christmas back in the States has been more of a pause than it would have been before my time in Taiwan, but as I reinvent myself in 2016, I have a feeling that Christmas will take on a new look as well, a space in time where I can truly pause and recharge my batteries and live in the moment of the season without getting wrapped up in the unnecessary trimmings.

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This post is part of SoCS and JusJoJan. Join us. You can check out the rules and the other participants for either or both of these events Linda’s blog.

Invitations: A Time to Say No

Some initial thoughts for 2016

When I visited A New Perspective Perhaps earlier today, it got me thinking about the struggle I am having as I begin the new year. As I work out the final details of my intended approach to the new year, the invitation in the post called out to me.

Can you feel the promise and excitement a new year brings? Empty slate. Blank pages waiting for you to fill them up. Get started!

Invitations like that have always called out to me, so today’s automatic response was no surprise. And while the invitation is a good one for a lot of people, I have finally come to realize that it’s not good for me. Based on what I’ve learned about myself in the last couple of years, I FINALLY know that when I see this kind of invitation, I have to run the other way.

At the urging of a friend, this was the year I sought out a doctor who might be able to check my depression diagnosis, and lo and behold, things are a bit more complicated than that. After treating depression for over 30 years, I now know that I have not only accompanying anxiety, but a dose of hypomania for good measure. It took a couple of attempts, but I found a doctor who was willing to listen to what I had to say. It was especially gratifying because in Taiwan, most doctors are good with English, but still, it’s not their first language. Still, the new diagnosis seems to fit me much better and has helped me move toward a life that feels less overwhelming and stressful. I’m fortunate that I don’t have a full bi-polar diagnosis, but in hindsight, I can see that much of my enthusiasm for anything shiny that passed before my eyes or mind was the result of a lack of filter that led to an overfull calendar and a recipe for exhaustion and disaster.

Although an adjustment to medication was a good start, I had to recognize that I could no longer continue life the way I had been. And that means that I have to think twice and consider which opportunities I can realistically pursue, and which I have to let pass me by. I find this to be a huge learning curve that involves a lot of trial and error. It also has pretty high costs when I make an error.

Still, here I am. Entering 2016 with the realization that I need to make a more concerted effort at scaling back without losing my dreams. But more than that, it means discovering what are real dreams and what are just sparkly distractions parading by as dreams.

So, the overarching theme is from the quote I posted on Wednesday, “Make peace with your broken pieces” by r.h. Sin. In the next few days and weeks, my goal is to determine what that means and how I can move forward to find the goals and intentions that will lead me toward my authentic dreams. In the process, I will be gentle with the broken pieces and make peace with them.

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So instead of taking a running start at those blank pages waiting for me to fill them up, I am going to take it slow and write more intentionally and leave lots of white space to create a story and a life with breathing space and where I can uncover what it really means to be me.

Stay tuned for some of the tools and ideas I will use along the path of learning to listen to my own wisdom.

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This post is part of Linda Hill’s Just Jot it January. That means, I’ll be attempting to Just Jot (something every day in) January. Maybe you’d like to join in.

jjj-2016

 

My Journey to Taiwan

As I am approach the halfway point of my 5th year in Taiwan, I going to answer a question posted by one of my blogging friends. So, Bear, this blog post is for you, as I embark on a new series about where I’m headed as I enter 2014.

I can’t find her exact question, but it was basically about how I ended up teaching here in Taiwan. She’s not the first to ask, and she won’t be the last. Every time I get a new class of students, someone will ask the question. The short answer is: I was invited. The long answer is: it happened through a series of invitations culminating in the specific one that led to my move to Taiwan.

In this post, I will offer three narratives about the journey to Taiwan. Two of them are previous posts for this blog, which detail the series of invitations I refer to in my long answer. Interestingly, it was a year ago that I wrote these two posts. At that time, my blog was only a couple months old. Now that I have more followers, there may be others who are also interested in this story. So it makes sense to offer these posts again.

The third narrative is a piece I wrote for my undergrad college alumni magazine as I was beginning my second year in Taiwan.

Here we go!

In the first post, I detail the first seven invitations and one of the consequences.

https://myriad234.wordpress.com/2013/02/15/invitations-my-path-to-taiwan-part-1/

Invitation 1: New Job Position
Invitation 2: Entering a Master’s Program
     Consequence: Decision to Complete BA
Invitation 3: A Marriage Proposal
Invitation 4: Joining the Honors Program
Invitation 5: Becoming a Writing Center Mentor
Invitation 6: Taking a Second Major
Invitation 7: Considering Graduate School

In the second post, I continue with three more invitations and a couple more consequences. At one point, the invitations seem to compete, but we sometimes limit what we think is possible, as I would discover.

https://myriad234.wordpress.com/2013/02/19/invitations-my-path-to-taiwan-part-2/

Invitations 8 and 9: Apply to the Roberts Fellowship Program
     Consequence: Travel to Asia
     Consequence: Shift in self-perceptions
     Competing Possibilities: A Fork in the Road
Invitation 10: “Come to Taiwan to Teach!”

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And now for my contribution to the alumni magazine.

If someone had asked me a year ago where I’d be today, Taiwan would not have made the list of possibilities. Leaving the US wasn’t even a consideration at that point. But life has a funny way of surprising us sometimes.

When I returned to SVSU in 2000 to finish a BA I had started nearly 30 years earlier, I did so because I wanted to enhance my credentials for my work in church ministry. During my first semester back, I took an Introduction to Sociology course both because it fit my work schedule and it met a general education requirement, but I was not looking forward to it. I didn’t think I would be interested in sociology. It turns out I didn’t have a very good understanding of what it was. But I had the good fortune to have a professor, Dr. Joni Boye-Beaman, who awakened in me a love for sociology that changed my life. Within two weeks of the semester’s beginning, I had changed my major to sociology and have never looked back.

Members of the English department faculty were also instrumental in helping me forge a new direction in my life. Judy Kerman approached me after my peer review work in one of her classes resulted in an improved paper for one of the students in my group. She asked if I had ever considered teaching and suggested that I think about graduate school. English would have remained a minor for me, but for Dave Gaskill. Although we lost his gifted teaching way too soon, I will always remember his advice both on my writing and on my approach to project management. He also talked me into majoring in Professional and Technical Writing. Diane Boehm welcomed me into the Writing Center and encouraged me to develop my twin loves of writing and teaching. Kay Harley, Janice Wolff, Phyllis Hastings, and Mary Harmon provided support and friendship as I completed my second major.

In the 2003-2004 year, I was accepted into the Roberts Fellows, and another round of surprises and experiences awaited me. In May of 2004, I visited Taiwan for the first time, and spent time at both Ming Chuan and Shih Hsin Universities. When we went to Tokashima University in Japan, I found myself feeling an urge to return to Japan for a year and teach English. I asked a few people about it while I was there and even mentioned it to my husband, who was also willing to join me in that endeavor. But there were many challenges. My youngest child was still in high school, my parents were recovering from a major car accident, and my age put me in a situation of having to choose between two competing goals–teaching overseas or going to grad school. At that time, it didn’t seem I could do both, so I went to graduate school.

But after graduate school, I began looking for a job teaching sociology in a community college. As I was preparing the materials for my applications, I emailed Dr. Robert Yien (former Vice-President of Academic Affairs) to ask him for a letter of recommendation. I did not realize that he was currently working at Ming Chuan University to assist them in working toward U.S. accreditation with the Middle States Commission on Higher Education in Philadelphia.

When Dr. Yien responded to my email, he not only agreed to write me a letter of recommendation, but he suggested that if I wanted to come to Ming Chuan and teach for a year or two, that I should let him know. I didn’t respond immediately, but over the next few weeks, I thought more and more about it–both the good and the bad. I knew I would like spending time in Taiwan, but it was a long way from my my family and friends. I knew I would make new friends in Taiwan, but I couldn’t just get on a plane and head home for the holidays. I discussed it with my friends and family, and eventually, I decided to pursue a position teaching English at MCU.

Some things made the decision easier. I had already visited here and had some sense of what I was getting into. I don’t think I would have been so willing to go to a place where I knew no one or nothing of the culture and environment. Also, Dr. Yien was here, so I had someone here that I knew. And most importantly, I knew that I could keep in touch with my family in ways that could not have been imagined even a few short years ago. With SKYPE, I am able to talk to my husband daily,* my parents a couple times a week, and my children with varying frequency. My mother even says she thinks she talks to me more in Taiwan than she did when I was in the States.

I love my work here. I enjoy my students–ok, most of them–and I am learning a lot about them, about their culture, and about myself. I feel very appreciated here, and I’m beginning to pick up a little bit of Chinese. Tonight when the clerk at the tea shop told me how much I owed, I understood the amount without having it translated to English! There have been many special moments–like when one of my students invited me to a student karoke competition because he was singing a Christmas song in English. After he sang, he spoke to me from the stage, thanked me for coming, and told me that even though I couldn’t be with my family for Christmas, that I wouldn’t be alone, that I would have them–my students. I couldn’t really ask for more than that.

*At the time I wrote this piece, my husband was still in the U.S. He joined me here in Taiwan as I began my third year here and has been with me since.

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The opportunity to teach abroad has given me a new appreciation of my abilities and confirmed my love of teaching. It has taught me that some of our best laid plans don’t always work out the way we had hoped. Sometimes, flexibility and creativity are needed to find the path to satisfying life work. And to have a life that’s larger than what I might have imagined for myself.

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If you have more questions about my Taiwanese adventure, please feel free to post them in the comments. I will try to respond, either there or in a supplemental post, depending on how many questions I get.

496 days to 60

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This post is also part of JustJotItJanuary (JusJoJan)

http://lindaghill.wordpress.com/2014/01/01/jusjojan-1-the-rules-are-easy/

Dreams and Dreamers (Musical Theme for January 5)

For a little extra entertainment, I thought I’d give you a little insight into the mother/daughter collaboration process. As we started on this one, I was in the middle of a work project, but Collaborator was on a roll, so she just kept going.

Keep in mind that when Collaborator and I work together, we are on opposite sides of the world, and our communication takes place via Facebook messaging. It is usually morning in Michigan where she is, and my grandson, Mr. Logan, is often nearby. It is evening in Taiwan where I am, where I am sometimes working on other things. But we somehow manage.

To say Collaborator was happy about this theme would be a huge understatement.

Collaborator: YAY! DREAMS! You could use your dance videos

Me: I could, but I think I want to do something else. Because I have very specific plans for the dance one

Collaborator: do you have an idea of what you want to do instead?

Me: I will give you an idea in a little bit. For me, it’s largely about possibility

When I came back from meeting with a student, I found these:

Dream Weaver (Gary Wright)

This was quickly followed up with her #2 offering:

Daydream Believer (Monkees)

I may have casually mentioned California Dreamin’, so I shouldn’t have been surprised when this popped up:

California Dreamin’ (The Mamas and the Papas)

Here’s where it starts to get really interesting.

Collaborator: There’s three dream songs, the other three can be more specific once you get a more specific idea.

A “little” time passes, and I get another message as she sends this.

Collaborator: So do you just want DREAM songs or do you want something a little more specific?

It’s hard to respond while I’m  listening to Fleetwood Mac, but I do after the song.

Dreams (Fleetwood Mac)

Me: “Not sure yet, but I think you may be all done before I decide 😉

Up pops this one:

Dream a Little Dream of Me (Ella Fitzgerald & Louis Armstrong)

Me: (appreciatively)  I like that one. There’s a song from the 50s or 60s about dreams, dreams, dreams that I can’t quite put my finger on”

BAM! Kate posts the video. And a comment:

Collaborator: You’re dreaming about songs from yesteryear.  (Such a darling child!)

All I Have to Do is Dream (Everly Brothers)

RIP Phil Everly (Jan. 3, 2014)

Collaborator:  That’s 6.

Me:  BUT . . . . we don’t have any Glee!

and then BAM! Kate strikes again, giving me her leftovers,

Hall of Fame (Glee)

But hey, I did this one all by myself!

Dream Baby Dream (Bruce Springsteen)

Me: Wow, I did this one all by myself. Geez, I sound so pathetic 😉

Collaborator: No, I sound like I need Ritalin.

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My dreaming colleagues:

Eva: chose this theme CALLING DREAMS AND DREAMERS  http://47whitebuffalo.wordpress.com/
Johnny:    http://johnnyojanpera.wordpress.com/
Bear:   http://bearspawprint.wordpress.com/2014/01/05/calling-dreams-and-dreamers-music-themes/#like-12318
Willow:   http://willowdot21.wordpress.com/2014/01/05/dreaming-calling-dreams-and-dreamers-music-theme-for-5-january-2014/
D.S.Nelson:   http://hatpaintladdersandwonkypooh.wordpress.com/
Collaborator:   http://sincerelykaterz.wordpress.com/

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JusJoJan

http://lindaghill.wordpress.com/2014/01/01/jusjojan-1-the-rules-are-easy/

11:21 a.m. on 1/4/14

Jigsaw puzzle on New Year's Eve

Jigsaw puzzle on New Year’s Eve

As the new year begins, I am doing a lot of reflection and planning for what I want to pursue. But I won’t be making resolutions. I’m not out to resolve things. I am out to live more fully and to embrace my goals and dreams for the future. Part of that involves really discovering what it is I want in life. And I intend to do some explorations in many areas of my life to refine what it is I want. I’ve started making lists, and I’m excited about the possibilities. You’ll be reading about some of them in my blog over the next few weeks, but at 11:21 this morning, I had just revealed one of my fun intensions to a friend, and now I’m going to share it with you.

At 11:21 this morning, I was talking on Skype with my friend Joycelyn of Farther to Go! fame. She and I have been friends for forty years and have been through a lot together. For the last few years, while I’ve been in Taiwan, we try to reserve this time every week to catch up, and to support each other in our respective endeavors. I knew when we started our conversation that the specified moment would arrive sometime during our conversation..

Joycelyn and I were having an interesting discussion about our respective fitness programs and how we were feeling differently because of what we were doing. We realized in the discussion that most people talk about going to the gym as a goal, when that’s not really the goal. It’s the means TO a goal, such as feeling better, getting stronger, getting in shape, or other possibilities. But at this time of year, people set a GOAL of going to the gym as if going to the gym in itself is something we really want. No wonder fitness goals often fall by the wayside. There is no real desire and motivation behind them, except maybe prodding from a doctor or loved one, or guilt, or some other negativity that we’re convinced we can (re)solve if we just have enough will power. Right!

There was much more to the conversation, but we began sharing some of the things we wanted for ourselves in the new year, and at 11:21, I had just finished telling Joycelyn about a challenge I have given myself for the year. Something I’m excited about. Something that will keep me jazzed and move me toward a goal I have had for a while, but was having trouble getting there.

So here’s the background. I live in Taiwan. This is my fifth year here, yet I know very little Chinese. I know enough Chinese to be somewhat entertaining to the natives, but that’s it. To be fair, I’m so busy with teaching, editing, and textbook writing, that I don’t have a lot of time for language study. And I did make a real effort before arriving, but learned the wrong accent, so even my minimal phrases I learned before I came weren’t too helpful. I’ve tried working with a few students who wanted to teach me some Chinese, but that never worked very well.

But one of the students from the new writing group is double majoring in English and in Teaching Chinese as a Second Language. She and I are setting up biweekly lessons for me. Just enough to give me a bit of language without it being too overwhelming. (She is one of the puzzle solvers in the picture above. She’s on the right.)

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOK, now here’s another piece about me you may not know. I use to be a music director for a church. I’m a keyboardist, choir director, and vocalist. Though I don’t do a lot of singing anymore, and never did much karaoke in the past, it seems like a fun way to spend a little time with students. The students tell me that most of the English songs at the karaoke places are “old.” They obviously forget who they’re talking to. I can do “old” songs.

But a couple of days ago, I realized that if I had the Romanized Chinese words and a YouTube video, I could learn a song in Chinese! It would give me an extra motivation for my language study, and satisfy the urge I have to sing. I can go with a group of students and do some singing in both languages. I am psyched!

I emailed the young lady in the picture above and told her of my plan, and she’s already sent me a couple of videos and the Romanized Chinese for both of them. Now I just have to talk to my new tutor and tell her of my crazy plan, but I know she’ll be as excited about it as I am.

And at a future moment in time, I will be singing a song in Chinese. And the plan is to record it and share it in a blog post. Stay tuned!  I’ll keep you posted!

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A Moment in Time is a shared blogging experience, where writers document and share their stories from the same moment on the same day. The day and time for the next A Moment in Time is posted by Randee every few days in such a way that you’ll have a heads up on the exact moment to which you need to attend and focus on and, if it’s significant in some way, write about and add to the list.

http://randeebergen.wordpress.com/2014/01/01/a-moment-in-time-1121-a-m-on-1414/

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I’m also participating in Just Jot it January *JusJoJan.” You just jot something everyday, even if it doesn’t always result in a blog post. Maybe several days’ jottings end up in one post. Lots of possibilities. Check it out here:

http://lindaghill.wordpress.com/2014/01/01/jusjojan-1-the-rules-are-easy/